27 January 2018

Travelling Around Australia Mick’s Way


When six-times Olympic coach Mick Miller discovered a lump on the side of his neck after a swim at his favourite beach in Sydney, little did he know that his life was about to take a dramatic twist.

Following the diagnosis of throat and neck cancer, Mick was facing one of the biggest challenges of his life. During a 70-day stay in hospital, he lost a total of 24 kg, as he was unable to eat apart from a feeding tube and unable to speak.

In hospital, Mick realised that he had been given a wake-up call. Having travelled extensively around the globe with various athletes and sporting teams, Mick decided it was time to see more of his own beautiful country. Wanting to keep his journey as simple as possible, he decided to travel around Australia in his 1968 sky blue Volkswagen Beetle named “The Rocket”.

Mick and 'The Rocket'
When he had gained some strength back, Mick’s journey of discovery and recovery began. He packed the Rocket with a 2-man tent, an esky, a sleeping bag, a blender and a few clothes; took a quick look at the map (turned it up the right way), found highway one and then he was off.

Mick spent 15 months on the road and recorded his journey along the way. Every couple of weeks he would send a video clip and a bunch of photos to his friend Robbyn Ford, who transcribed these into Mick’s blog.

From Bulahdelah to Bruny Island, Travelling Around Australia Mick’s Way follows his journey and captures Mick’s daily adventures in the backdrop of the awe-inspiring Australian landscape. His story and his photography are real, heartfelt and inspiring.

To find out more about Mick Miller go to http://www.mickmiller.com.au

To read and hear more of Mick Miller

http://www.cancercouncil.com.au/people/mick-miller-webinar

14 January 2018

Web Spin: Harley-Davidson 2018 Low Rider Softail



With the majority of H-D models now falling into the Softail range, it follows that most buyers will be making their choice from the nine offered within this newly redesigned category.

You’ll recall we tested the Street Bob last September and we’ve ridden the Fat Boy and Breakout since then and can report that each one has its own character and appeal - or not.

Our Milwaukee-Eight 107ci Low Rider test bike came from Harley Heaven Western Sydney and I could see a glint in the eye of dealer principal, Craig Smith, when he handed me the keys.

“The boys have fitted a Screamin’ Eagle Stage 1 kit with race tuner, Street Cannon mufflers and an extreme flow air cleaner,” said Craig, “so you’ll notice a little extra sparkle in this one.”

He wasn’t kidding. Not that a Stage 1 will blow you away exactly, but you will notice the (around) 10 per cent extra power and torque coming in early and staying there as you accelerate through the rev range. The ‘oomph’ kicks in quicker and the twin pipes have the orchestra playing with extra ‘forte’. My apologies to the neighbours.

This bike also came in the factory ‘Vivid Black’ scheme which harks back to knee-high sports socks and horseshoe moustaches thanks to the retro tank livery. There’s lashings of chrome too, all around the twin tank dials and front fork arrangement. This much chrome can have its downside though when the bright sun reflects off it. Get Craig to throw in some H-D polarised sunglasses with this one.

2018 H-D Low Rider (H-D supplied)
Out on the road, I found myself on the pace quickly within our riding group of mixed abilities. We took the familiar route through the Royal National Park and back through Appin and Wallacia, so there’s plenty of tight corners and some lovely sweepers. Some might feel the riding position unfamiliar and perhaps not suited to brisk riding through the twisty bits but - remember I’m still an H-D novice - I don’t think I would have gone any faster or slower on any others from the Softail range.

The rear monoshock can be easily adjusted to suit your own style and comfort, as with any bike in the Softail range.

Low Rider comes in close to the Softail range entry-level and will suit regular sized guys and gals (up to about 180cm) as well as those keen on further customisation. And when you’re trying out your new Softail, be sure to test them all. It’s a very personal choice and if the Low Rider is not for you, there are eight others (and counting) to choose from.

At home and in good company. Test bike in Picton. (RE)

Test Bike:

MY18 Harley-Davidson Low Rider
107ci Milwaukee-Eight engine (1,745 cc) with optional Stage 1 Screamin’ Eagle performance kit.
Priced from $24,250
Stage 1 kit fitted: poa



Test bike supplied by Harley-Heaven Western Sydney
70 Sunnyholt Road,
Blacktown, New South Wales 2148

13 January 2018

Cuban Harleys, Mi Amor



Not just a book about motorcycles
Cuba: Exotic. In transition. Thrilling.

Cuba from the perspective of a small, unique subculture. 50 portraits of people who have resisted the embargo for a long time and have kept their Harley-Davidson motorcycles neat and tidy.

In 1967, the Government ordered all Police Harleys be buried in a hole in a prison in Santiago de Cuba for ideological reasons. Then, in the 70s and 80s, spare parts were nowhere to be found, so Cuban Harlistas cannibalized parts from Russian cars and adapted them according to their needs – pistons from Ladas and valves from Kamas, while exhaust pipes were made from old transformers.



A Harley was only worth a tip, nobody wanted these big and expensive bikes. Especially not in the “Periodio Especial” following the fall of the Socialist bloc, when an economic crisis almost drove the country to its knees, famine ruled and gas was unaffordable.

Against all odds, “Harlistas” defended their ancient machines which served them so well. In time, the American bikes regained their public reputation as means of transportation as well as a status symbol. The owner exudes not only self confidence but also exclusivity, a fact not to be underestimated in the macho country that is Cuba.




Ernesto Guevara-March
They tell readers about their bikes, but most of all about their country

These 50 portraits taken by Italian photographer Max Cucchi, were produced over a ten-year span and illustrate these beautiful motorcycles in archetypical Cuban settings. However, what these images also reveal are the owners in their private environment: In the living room, on the field, in the center of Havana, and of course, in their garages.

They tell us about their machines, but most of all about their country - about the problems, the difficulties which they have to face every day. You will get to know a lot about Cuba and about the people who live there, about their perseverance, their slyness, their passion and their tenacity.

Those who still want to get to know the “old” Cuba have come to the right place. Cuban Harleys, Mi Amor, is an entertaining history lesson. With this book and its beautiful images, readers are transported via the American Harley Davidson iron hogs, which page by page show the Cuban reality, (English, Spanish and German) which above all tell us one thing: What Cuba is really like.

Cuban Harleys, Mi Amor. 
Backroad Diaries Publishers. 172 pages, Trilingual: English, Spanish, German, hardcover, 35 Dollar. ISBN: 9783981602340. Available: www.backroad-diaries.de, Amazon.

Website: www.backroad-diaries.de

Facebook: backroad-diaries und Cuban Harleys, Mi Amor.

Contakt: cuba@backroad-diaries.de, Publisher direct: (+49) 151 – 19660291